Amethyst


Amethyst has been used to make jewelry and valued as a gemstone since the time of the ancient Egyptians.
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Amethyst

Amethyst Point


Unlike the amethyst cluster, an amethyst point is a single amethyst crystal. Amethysts are popular collectible minerals and have been valued as gemstones since ancient times.
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Amethyst Point

Aventurine


Aventurine is a green quartz with crystals too small to see with the naked eye. Aventurine is found in shades of silver, yellow, red, brown, and green.
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Aventurine

Black Onyx


Black Onyx is cryptocrystalline, which means that your sample is composed of crystals so tiny that they cannot be seen by the naked eye.
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Black Onyx

Black Tourmaline


Tourmaline can come in a variety of colors, but black is very common. It can be found in igneous and metamorphic rocks.
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Black Tourmaline

Blue Kyanite


Blue Kyanite forms under tremendous pressure. How much pressure? Imagine a schoolbus balanced on one wheel on top of a quarter. Now imagine another on top of the first. That is about 50-60 pounds per square inch of pressure, which are the conditions inside of the earth where kyanite is formed.
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Blue Kyanite

Blue Quartz


The blue color in blue quartz is due to the scattering of light from tiny inclusions inside the crystal matrix.
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Blue Quartz

Chalcedony


Chalcedony is a term that applies to a wide variety of quartz with cryptocrystalline crystal structure. Agate, aventurine, onyx and chrysoprase are all examples of chalcedony.
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Chalcedony

Chrysocolla


Chrysocolla is a lightweight mineral with a bright blue-green color. Although is has a bright color, chrysocolla is brittle and rarely used for jewelry. It's streak can range from white to blue-green.
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Chrysocolla

Chrysoprase


The apple-green color in chrysoprase comes from tiny inclusions of nickel inside of the cryptocrystalline (tiny crystal) matrix. The color of chrysoprase makes it favorite of rock and mineral collectors.
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Chrysoprase

Citrine Point


Citrine is a tan-yellow variety of quartz, one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crust.
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Citrine Point

Emerald Quartz


This type of emerald quartz is also known as serpantine.
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Emerald Quartz

Fluorite


Fluorite is a defining mineral on Moh's Scale of Hardness (it's #4). When you cleave fluorite, the resulting surface is so perfectly smooth that it shines.
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Fluorite

Frozen Quartz


Quartz is one of the most abundant minerals in the Earth's crust. Your clear quartz sample is sometimes known as "frozen quartz", "pure quartz" or "rock crystal".
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Frozen Quartz

Garnet


Garnets have been used by humans since the bronze. Species of garnet can differ chemically, but they all share similar physical properties such as color, hardness, and streak.
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Garnet

Geodes


Geodes (also known as thunder eggs) are spherical rocks that are partially filled with minerals. These geodes are filled with quartz, which is the most abundant mineral found inside of geodes. The physical properties listed below are for the quartz interior and not the rock exterior.
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Geodes

Gold Tigers Eye


Gold Tigers Eye is an example of a chatoyant mineral due to the fibrous nature of the matrix.
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Gold Tigers Eye

Green Calcite


Calcite is a very common mineral and comes in a variety of different colors. It is a defining standard on Moh's scale of hardness (it's number 3).
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Green Calcite

Green Tigers Eye


Green Tigers Eye is an example of a chatoyant rock (oiel de chat is french for "cat's eye"). Chatoyance refers to the fibrous structure of the mineral's matrix.
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Green Tigers Eye

Gypsum Rosettes


Also known as the "desert rose", gypsum rosettes are formed in arid, sandy conditions. Gypsum is one of the defining standards (gypsum is #2) on Moh's scale of hardness.
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Gypsum Rosettes

Hematite


Hematite is a favorite of collectors. It has cool nicknames like red ochre and Alaska black diamond, it is found on Mars, it streaks red, it has a metallic luster, and is attracted to magnets. This is a fun mineral to add to your collection!
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Hematite

Howlite


Howlite is a mineral that is commonly used in art and jewelry making. One interesting property of howlite is that it is porous and will readily accept dyes.
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Howlite

Lepidolite Mica


Lepidolite Mica is also known as lavenderine, lithia mica, lithionite, and flower sugarlite.
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Lepidolite Mica

Orange Calcite


Calcite is a very common mineral that comes in a wide variety of colors. Calcite is also a standard (it is number 3) on Moh's scale of hardness.
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Orange Calcite

Peacock Pyrite


Peacock Pyrite is another name for chalcopyrite, an important mineral ore. When exposed to oxygen in the air, chalcopyrite turns into a variety of bright colors, thus the name "peacock".
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Peacock Pyrite

Petrified Wood


Petrified Wood is actually a fossil created by an ancient tree. Over many years, the wood was replaced by minerals (in our case, quartz).
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Petrified Wood

Pumice


Pumice is an igneous rock that is created when super-heated rock is ejected from a volcano. As the rock cools, bubble form which give the pumice a "sponge-like" appearance.
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Pumice

Pyrite


Pyrite is also known as fools gold because of its metallic luster and gold coloring. It is the most common of the sulfide minerals.
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Pyrite

Red Tiger Eye


Some collector's call it "Tiger's Eye" and some call it "Tiger Eye"... both are commonly used. Notable sources of tiger's eye are the United States, Canada, Korea, South Africa, Burma, India, Brazil, China, and Spain.
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Red Tiger Eye

Rose Quartz


The pink color in rose quartz is due to trace metals such as titanium, iron, or manganese. Rose quartz is always found in a solid mass and rarely forms crystals. Why? Scientists aren't sure.... Maybe you can solve this mystery.
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Rose Quartz

Rough Amazonite


Amazonite is also known as the amazon stone. The name originates from stones of similar color that were discovered in the Amazon Basin.
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Rough Amazonite

Rough Apatite


Apatite is interesting because it is a major component of tooth enamel. It is also a standard on Moh's scale of hardness.
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Rough Apatite

Rough Epidote


Epidote sometimes displays the property of pleochrism. This is an optical property where the mineral seems to change color as the angle of the light changes.
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Rough Epidote

Rubellite Tourmaline


Rubellite Tourmaline is also known as red tourmaline. There are twenty seven different varieties of tourmaline. Tourmaline is considered a semi-precious gemstone and is used in art and jewelry making.
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Rubellite Tourmaline

Sandstone


Sandstone is a sedimentary rock that is composed of tiny grains of quartz or feldspar.
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Sandstone

Selenite


Selenite is a type of gypsum, a soft mineral that is a reference standard on Moh's Scale of Hardness (gypsum is number 2).
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Selenite

Smokey Alligator Quartz


Smokey alligator quartz gets its name from it's crystal structure (known as the chevron), which resembles the scales of an alligator.
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Smokey Alligator Quartz

Sodalite


Blue is the most common color, but sodalite may also be yellow, pink, gray, or green. Many sodalite specimens will fluoresce in ultraviolet light.
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Sodalite

Star Mica


Micas are minerals that can be found in all three rock types (igneous, metamorphic, sedimentary). Star mica is also known as muscovite.
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Star Mica

Tumbled Agate


Tumbled agates come in a variety of bright colors. Like a snowflake, no two are identical. You can identify them by the striped bands inside of the mineral matrix. Although agates can be found in any type of rock, they are more typically discovered in volcanic (igneous) and metamorphic rock.
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Tumbled Agate

Zebra Jasper


Zebra Jasper is a sedimentary rock that shares many of the properties of quartz. It is, in fact, composed of cryptocrystalline (tiny crystals) made of silica (quartz).
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Zebra Jasper